Senator Ricardo Lara Fights for Californians’ Right to Know

At Seventh Generation we believe you have a right to know what goes into the products you use. That’s why we are standing with Senator Ricardo Lara (CA-D) as he fights for ingredient transparency in cleaning products in California.

Over the past 30 years, the California legislature has been championing laws to protect citizens from exposure to toxic chemicals. In 1986, the state passed Prop 65, the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act, requiring a warning label for products that contain carcinogens. In 2008, the state implemented the California Green Chemistry Law, creating a program to evaluate specific chemicals in consumer products and demanding companies use safer alternatives.

We commend California for creating some of the most health-protective policies in the country. However, in our opinion, these policies don’t go far enough on transparency. Warning labels on products are still not required to disclose specific chemicals of concern under Prop 65. Similarly, the Green Chemistry Law does not require chemical disclosure.

It’s time for California to lead on ingredient transparency. That’s why we are proud to stand today with Senator Lara in support of SB 258, The Cleaning Products Right to Know Act. This Act would require manufacturers of both consumer and industrial cleaning products to disclose all intentionally-added ingredients on product labels.

This may seem like a no-brainer – food, cosmetics and drug companies are required to disclose ingredients. Surprisingly, manufacturers of cleaning products are not. Without a statewide requirement, consumers and workers are not fully aware of what is in the cleaning products they use and are unable to avoid ingredients that they may be allergic to or not want to bring into their home.

Consumers themselves are demanding this information. In fact, many think the State already requires ingredients to be listed on cleaning products.

SB 258 provides a clear set of rules for workers, consumers, and companies on how all ingredients should be listed on the package of the item being sold.

While this won’t solve all the exposure problems associated with cleaning products, this is a critical first step – one that puts California at the forefront of national policy when it comes to ingredient disclosure in cleaning products.

Learn more about the work we are doing to fight for ingredient disclosure in the United States.