Peter M. Senge | Seventh Generation
Skip to Content

Peter M. Senge

  • Pin It

Pausing Today to Think About Tomorrow

0 comments
Author:

I spent two days this week doing something I haven’t done for five if not ten years: going to a retreat to explore who I want to be in the next iteration of my life. The retreat was led by Peter Senge and the Shambhala Institute outside Boston on bright, crisp sunny days that just oh-so-faintly smelled of springtime. We meditated, rolled around on the floor, did some movement that seemed to approximate modern dance and talked about the transformations we were most passionate about effecting in our own lives.

We discussed and explored questions that often elude us in the very focused lives we seem to lead. How do we balance “doing” vs. “being?” What is humanity? Why do we as a society place so little value on being? How much of the effect we have in the world comes from what we do as opposed to who we are? Why is empty space so uncomfortable that we seem to always need to fill it? How can we value what we don’t know as much or more than what we do know? Why do we have such a limited capacity to hold the whole of anything and seem to focus on its parts?

Reflections and thoughts. The difference between being committed and being a fanatic is that a fanatic is certain of the answers and has stopped asking questions. Real commitment comes in the midst of profound uncertainty. We live in a world of infinite interdependence. I met a woman who gave away 90% of everything she owned to become what she believed in. I was awe struck. The only emotion that expands creativity, possibility and potential is love.

So for me, the answer is to step out as boldly as possible into the center of the mainstream business world with all my passion and all of my might to inspire the profound change needed to alter the destructive path we are on and to capture the full potential of our humanity to create a world that is equitable, just, peaceful and sustainable.

See Full Post
  • Pin It

In the Swirl with Peter Senge

0 comments
Author:

On a mostly sunny late afternoon last week, Peter Senge
and I crossed paths at Trapp Family Lodge in Stowe, where he was vacationing with his family, and I was attending a management retreat. As frequent readers of the Inspired Protagonist know, I’m a huge fan of Peter’s. During the conversation he shared two thoughts on strategic planning that resonated with me since that’s what I was in Stowe trying to do.

See Full Post
  • Pin It

Seeking the Wave That Will Set Us Free

0 comments
Author:

“Presencing constitutes a third type of seeing, beyond seeing external reality and beyond seeing from within the living whole. It is seeing from within the source from which the future whole is emerging, peering back at the present from the future. In these moments, we can feel linked to our highest future possibility and destiny.”

From Presence by Peter M. Senge, C. Otto Scharmer, Joseph Jaworski, and Betty Sue Flowers.

6:30 am, Wainscott, NY. There wasn’t a cloud in the sky. Miles of empty beach stretched out in both directions. The tide was just past its highest point. Four to six foot waves were breaking at once gently and with fury about 50 yards off the shore. I walked along the beach searching for the optimal point at which to enter the ocean. The perfection of nature was more than my eyes could take in, and yet they did. The sun was just beginning to show its warmth. I always approach these early morning sojourns with the hope of just one wave to remember.

I wait with no waiting from a future though I never quite know what form it will take. My highest future possibility and destiny may be about to emerge from within me. But then again they might not. It is all there and then again hidden from view. Hidden by the me that is not yet ready to surrender to that destiny.

We believe because we are told so that there is no destiny, no path that we were meant to pursue. Just a linear progression of limited possibilities. But it is there, waiting at our finger tips, underneath our eye lids, behind the wave that we hesitate to take. That path that contains all purpose and possibility. The path the world needs us to take, that will set us free, that makes no sense with in the reality that dominates most of our lives.

See Full Post
  • Pin It

Presence

0 comments
Author:

Over the past month, I’ve been reading Presence by Peter M. Senge, C. Otto Scharmer, Joseph Jaworski, and Betty Sue Flowers. Those of you who have come to know me probably realize by now that I’m a pretty obsessive reader. Yet unlike most of what I read, Presence was more like a wonderful meditation than the acquisition of information. It is one of the most important and valuable books I’ve read over the past 5 to 10 years. Over the next few posts I make I’ll try to explain why.

One quote I will probably never forget is “the longest road is often from your mind to your heart.” It will (I hope) forever remind me that more value will always come from love than anything else. How can I do all that I do lovingly. As a serial entrepreneur, I am pretty good at action, criticism, analysis, and creativity. I still have a lot to learn about love. One can of course be lovingly critical or analytical, but somehow the depth of my analysis usually seems greater than the depth of my love.

I was also overwhelmed with the notion of how much of our lives fall with-in the preestablished patterns we seem to follow over and over. Whether it’s how we respond to each other, read the newspaper, participate in a meeting, or watch a sunset, most of what we do we do as we have done before. Somehow the idea of doing it differently doesn’t occur to us. Yet outside our patterns lies all possibility. Whether it’s figuring out how to stop global warming, be a better lover, or design a new product, 99% of what is possible but yet to be waits outside the pattern.

If we can slow down our thinking enough to actually watch how we think, become conscious of the generation of our thoughts, question whether there is another way to see what we are seeing, do what we are doing, and hold what we are holding, a whole new world opens up before us.

More to come…

See Full Post
Subscribe to RSS - Peter M. Senge