7GenBlog | Seventh Generation
Skip to Content

7GenBlog

  • Pin It

Every Body Loves Organic

0 comments
Author: the Inkslinger

There’s been a quiet controversy simmering for a bunch of years now about whether or not organic food is nutritionally better for us than conventional food. We know it’s healthier than conventional food where contaminants are concerned. There’s no debate, for example, about whether or not people eating organic food have to worry about weird hormones in their cheese or pesticide residues on their peaches. They don’t. But what about what’s inside organic foods? What about the vitamins and minerals and the other things that make food healthy in the first place? Is there more of the good stuff in organic food?

A bunch of studies have hinted that, yes, there is. But these research efforts generally haven’t been very big or they’ve only looked at certain nutrients or they’ve had some other issue that allowed Big Agricultural to always say, ‘Yeah, but…” and cast enough doubt on the evidence to maintain the status quo.

That may not last much longer. A new study in England, a big, comprehensive, hard-to-refute new study, has found that organic food is not only healthier for you, it’s much healthier for you.

See Full Post
  • Pin It

Fit to Bee Tied

0 comments
Author: the Inkslinger

Our Sage of Scent, Eva Marie, sent us this great bee article
yesterday. It’s an excellent recounting of the general state of affairs where our pollinating friends are concerned.

It appears things are so broken so many ways it’s simply a wonder that honeybees survived this long without a major malfunction. That’s the what’s really surprising about colony collapse disorder. Not that it happened. But that it didn’t happen sooner.

We have really got to get away from the idea of agriculture as industry and find our way back to the wisdom that will reconnect our food to Earth’s great cycles and allow us to see it not as a product to be manufactured with ruthless efficiency but as an elemental force summoned from soil and air and rain and sun through a human/nature partnership. We must grow our food in a process that honors the mystery of it all and takes great care to work within the balance and harmony that makes life possible. If we don’t, the bees haven’t a chance. And neither do the species, certain bipedals included, that depend on them.

See Full Post
  • Pin It

Can’t Get No Satisfaction

0 comments
Author: the Inkslinger

Sometimes a guest post arrives which needs nothing extra added from anyone here. This is one, and here it is…

See Full Post
  • Pin It

Out of the In-Box

0 comments
Author: the Inkslinger

Time to empty out the in-box and see what riches the gods of information have deigned to deliver unto us upon the quivering wires…

Carbon labeling is coming to a product near you. And about time, too. We label for just about everything else under the sun but until now we’ve overlooked what’s by far the biggest elephant in the better shopping room. It’ll take ahwile for these labels to become ubiquitous, but this pachyderm is loose at last and there’s no closing the barn doors now.

By way of Treehugger comes this cool list from Coop America of 21 things you didn’t know you could recycle that’s definitely worth recycling here.

As a big tiger fan (and I’m not talking baseball), I’m encouraged by the news from India that a bunch of these big beautiful cats have just been discovered
in a mountainous jungle region some 30 years after experts thought they’d gone locally extinct. Proof that when we have the wisdom to leave well enough alone, Nature is quick to bounce back.

See Full Post
  • Pin It

Today’s Cafeteria Special: a Green and Trash-Free Lunch

0 comments
Author: the Inkslinger

Please meet Laurel Peltier, the newest addition to our roster of guest bloggers. Laurel tells us she is a 42 year-old mom of three living in Baltimore, Maryland who writes freelance articles about the environment. She says she used to be a consumer product manager, MBA-types often disparaged by greenies, she notes, but she’s now applying her marketing skills for Mother Earth.

To me, it seems families, especially Mom are hard to reach, we're very busy juggling many things, so I try and write about ideas that relate. Here’s a short brief I wrote for Maryland Family magazine about greening our kids’ lunches.

Looking for ways to become eco-friendly? An easy place to make a difference is with your child’s lunch.

Though juice boxes and individually wrapped ‘grab and go’ foods are convenient, they generate tons of trash. Each year the average child dumps sixty-seven pounds of lunchbox trash costing school districts valuable dollars to collect and dispose of the trash.

Re-thinking how your child’s meal gets packed can reduce trash going to landfills and has some unexpected benefits. Here are some simple ways to pack a trash-free lunch:

See Full Post
  • Pin It
  • Pin It

Just Say Bisphe-No…

0 comments
Author: the Inkslinger

I’m staying on the anti-bisphenol-A bandwagon for at least one more post here. There are a lot of people jumping on, and it’s nice to finally have some company. Tons of stuff coming over the wires about this chemical. Last Thursday, a group of several dozen scientists issued a statement saying bisphenol-A was causing serious health problems in people.

And this week, a federally annointed panel of experts is supposed to be releasing their own verdict on the chemical (given all the political manipulation of science in the White House these days, however, I’d take this report with a big grain of salt. Or aspirin…).

The flurry of activity is focusing a surprising amount of media attention on this fairly obscure but-maybe-hopefully-not-for-much-longer toxin. If I haven’t thrown up enough links here for you, our pals at Grist have been all over this one lately and have even more.

See Full Post
  • Pin It

Bisphenol-Freakin’ A

0 comments
Author: the Inkslinger

ScienceMan sent me a great article this morning on bisphenol-A. As he said in his e-mail, “It confirms our worst fears about the chemical, the chemical industry, and our regulatory system.”

Now right away I know what everyone’s thinking… “Bisphenol what? Oh good lord… Spare me. I can’t even pronounce it let alone summon the necessary gumption to read an entire article about all this crap. Please just shoot me first.”

I dig the sentiment. It’s quite legit. Diving into this stuff will harsh your mellow, kill your buzz, rain on your parade, and wilt your will to live like it was a plucked flower in a pizza oven.

But here’s the thing: Everybody’s gotta start keying into this whole chemical contamination thing. Because it’s really right up there with the climate crisis in terms of the things we gotta fix yesterday if not sooner. People have to understand that what you can’t see can hurt you and it’s everywhere these days. In our food. In our water. In our soil. In ourselves. And it’s literally killing us softly with its discordant song.

See Full Post
  • Pin It

What in the World is Going On?

0 comments
Author: the Inkslinger


Visual by www.PDImages.com

I’ve been rolling elsewhere lately, but the world’s been rolling on, and it’s high time to play a little catch up and see what’s been happening as it has. Though the “save page as” command and a bulging virtual folder on my hard drive have pretty much replaced my old-fashioned scissors and the mound of newspaper and magazine cuttings they used to create, I still call them “clippings,” and here’s my latest batch:

Glycol ethers are in the news. Say what? I know… There was a time when I hadn’t heard of ‘em either. But they’re pretty nasty and a new survey of ingredients in cleaning products has found them in a ton of popular brands, which, to use a technical term, sucks dust bunnies.

Speaking of conventional “cleaners,” (and man, there’s a misnomer if ever there was one) a new study on those you spray says they’re linked to asthma. The study in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine arrives in fairly incomprehensible science-speak so I’ll bottom line it: The more you use them the harder you’ll find it to breathe.

See Full Post
  • Pin It

Bee Line: Imidacloprid Is Da Culprit?

0 comments
Author: the Inkslinger

It wouldn’t surprise anyone (at least here) to find out that chemical poisoning is ultimately to blame for the strange epidemic of honeybee vanishings. That idea gets another boost today from new reports that researchers are zeroing in on the pesticide imidacloprid as the likely cause.

“Research has shown that in sublethal doses imidacloprid and other neonicotinoids can impair honeybees' memory and learning, as well as their motor activity and navigation. Recent studies have reported ``anomalous flying behavior'' in imidacloprid-treated bees, in which the workaholic insects simply fall to the grass or appear unable to fly toward the hive.”
See Full Post