7GenBlog | Seventh Generation
Skip to Content

7GenBlog

  • Pin It

Blessed Unrest

0 comments
Author:

I just finished reading Paul Hawken’s new book Blessed Unrest. It is a beautifully written, extensively researched, deeply thoughtful but in the end unsatisfying read. While Hawken talks convincingly about the convergence of the environmental/sustainability movement with the social justice and indigenous rights movements (collectively described as “the movement,”) and the significance of the millions of organizations that have arisen world-wide to tackle the many issues that all these movements encompass, I don’t believe that this alone will adequately address our challenges.

The role and responsibility of business is for the most part sadly minimized and its potential unconsidered.

In the last pages of the book, Hawken writes:

“The only spiritually responsible way I know to be a citizen, artist, or activist in these strange times is by giving little or no thought to ‘great things’ such as saving the planet, achieving world peace, or stopping neocon greed. Great things tend to be undoable things.”

While I understand the sentiment, I disagree wholeheartedly. To face the challenges that confront us today, we need a symphony of commitment and possibility. From those of us that are only willing to make small adjustments to our lifestyle to those of us willing to ensure that the world’s largest corporations become a source of hope and positive impact, only by believing that we can, as Hawken says, re-make the world into a better place, will that possibility come into existence.

See Full Post
  • Pin It

Presence

0 comments
Author:

Over the past month, I’ve been reading Presence by Peter M. Senge, C. Otto Scharmer, Joseph Jaworski, and Betty Sue Flowers. Those of you who have come to know me probably realize by now that I’m a pretty obsessive reader. Yet unlike most of what I read, Presence was more like a wonderful meditation than the acquisition of information. It is one of the most important and valuable books I’ve read over the past 5 to 10 years. Over the next few posts I make I’ll try to explain why.

One quote I will probably never forget is “the longest road is often from your mind to your heart.” It will (I hope) forever remind me that more value will always come from love than anything else. How can I do all that I do lovingly. As a serial entrepreneur, I am pretty good at action, criticism, analysis, and creativity. I still have a lot to learn about love. One can of course be lovingly critical or analytical, but somehow the depth of my analysis usually seems greater than the depth of my love.

I was also overwhelmed with the notion of how much of our lives fall with-in the preestablished patterns we seem to follow over and over. Whether it’s how we respond to each other, read the newspaper, participate in a meeting, or watch a sunset, most of what we do we do as we have done before. Somehow the idea of doing it differently doesn’t occur to us. Yet outside our patterns lies all possibility. Whether it’s figuring out how to stop global warming, be a better lover, or design a new product, 99% of what is possible but yet to be waits outside the pattern.

If we can slow down our thinking enough to actually watch how we think, become conscious of the generation of our thoughts, question whether there is another way to see what we are seeing, do what we are doing, and hold what we are holding, a whole new world opens up before us.

More to come…

See Full Post