7GenBlog | Seventh Generation
Skip to Content

7GenBlog

The latest news, food for thought, recipes you’ll love, great advice on everything from raising kids to nurturing bees, plus videos designed to entertain, educate and enlighten. If you’d like to find out what’s on our mind – or let us know what’s on yours -- this is place to be.

  • Pin It

David Gershon and the Low Carbon Diet

0 comments
Author:

We are working with David Gershon's program (presented in his book Low Carbon Diet) at 7th Gen and in local Verm

See Full Post
  • Pin It

Fit to Bee Tied

0 comments
Author: the Inkslinger

Our Sage of Scent, Eva Marie, sent us this great bee article
yesterday. It’s an excellent recounting of the general state of affairs where our pollinating friends are concerned.

It appears things are so broken so many ways it’s simply a wonder that honeybees survived this long without a major malfunction. That’s the what’s really surprising about colony collapse disorder. Not that it happened. But that it didn’t happen sooner.

We have really got to get away from the idea of agriculture as industry and find our way back to the wisdom that will reconnect our food to Earth’s great cycles and allow us to see it not as a product to be manufactured with ruthless efficiency but as an elemental force summoned from soil and air and rain and sun through a human/nature partnership. We must grow our food in a process that honors the mystery of it all and takes great care to work within the balance and harmony that makes life possible. If we don’t, the bees haven’t a chance. And neither do the species, certain bipedals included, that depend on them.

See Full Post
  • Pin It

Peter Senge on Sustainability

0 comments
Author:

Peter Senge, MIT lecturer and sustainability systems thinker (Fift

See Full Post
  • Pin It

Exposed On the Radio

0 comments
Author: the Inkslinger

Last month’s issue of the Non-Toxic Times reviewed the new book from investigative journalist Mark Shapiro, Exposed: The Toxic Chemistry of Everyday Products and What's at Stake for American Power. This is an important work not because it outlines the many ways Americans are being harmed by toxic products and the laissez-faire regulatory climate that places corporate protectionism ahead of consumer protections but becauase it addresses what this means for our economic future and American influence in the world.

Shapiro argues that in a world trending toward green, strong regulations based on the Precautionary Principle will serve a country well both ecologically and economically (as in Europe) and that those nations that don’t follow this path (as ours is currently refusing to do) won’t be able to compete in a global marketplace with higher environmental standards and so are destined to lose out in a big way. Excellent thesis and I totally agree. Ironically, in the long run, all these corporations that say regulations harm business and the economy are just shooting both in the foot.

All of which is a somewhat roundabout way of mentioning that Shapiro was on California’s KQED radio last week. The program is archived here for your auditory illumination . It’s very much worth listening to and the book is one everyone should read. Especially all these recalcitrant business types…

See Full Post
  • Pin It

This and That From Here and There

0 comments
Author: the Inkslinger

It’s going to be a little quiet around here during the next couple of days as most of the staff heads to the hills outside Stowe for a two-day retreat. That makes it a perfect time to dump my virtual in-box out on the table and see what seems post-worthy.

A new survey finds that Americans are getting ahead of the political curve when it comes to the climate crisis. 62% think that we’re headed for major trouble if we don’t act decisively and soon. Encouragingly, 40% say a presidential candidates position on this burning issue will be extremely or very important to them. Still, we apparently aren’t quite ready to put our money where our viewpoints are. 67% are against carbon taxes on gasoline and 71% are against taxes on electricity. In other words, we don’t want to pay the price of global warming but we don’t want to pay the price of avoiding it either.

But here’s the thing: with a little investment, we could all cool out. According to a study released last week by the alarmingly named National Security Space Office, we have the technology necessary to build a bunch of giant solar space things that could collect enough energy from the sun every year to supply the entire world with all the power it could squander seven times over. The energy would be beamed back to earth via lasers or microwaves (will we also be able to set our bowls of ramen noodles outside for convenient heating?). Of course, we’d have to build these orbiting juicers and get them up there, but with crude oil closing in on $100 a barrel, giant solar space things are actually getting cost-competitive. Something tells me that if you (ahem) taxed petroleum and other energy sources to account for the environmental damage they cause, we’d be launching them even as I write.

See Full Post
  • Pin It
  • Pin It

Joe Laur on being Audacious

0 comments
Author:

Joe Laur from SoL, the Society for Organizational Learning, friend and systems thinker was recently at 7th Generation with the

See Full Post
  • Pin It

Making Ourselves Sick

0 comments
Author:

Over the weekend, the Times of London reported on a study published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine by the American Thoracic Society. The results are not surprising and speak for themselves.

“The relative risk rates of developing adult asthma in relation to exposure to cleaning products could account for as much as 15 per cent, or one in seven, of adult asthma cases.”

In fact, the study found that subjects who used household spray cleaners at least once a week increased their risk of developing asthma symptoms by an incredible 30 to 50 percent.

Singled out as particularly likely to trigger asthma were conventional glass cleaners, furniture sprays, and air fresheners, which typically contain chemicals like ammonia, chlorine-releasing agents and sodium hydroxide. Researchers suggested that it's significantly easier to get exposed to these and other chemicals when they're released into the air in spray form. This, of course, is something we've been concerned about for years. When we spray a cleaning product, a certain amount never makes it to the surface we're cleaning. Instead, it goes out into the air in the form of something called aerosols, super-tiny microscopic particles that are so lightweight they can stay suspended in the air for hours--the same air we then breathe.

Let's wake up before too many more people smell the spray cleaners.

See Full Post
  • Pin It

Troubled Waters

0 comments
Tags:
Author: the Inkslinger

Who owns the water? It’s a good question, and once we get past the whole planet-melting-into-a big-squishy-puddle thing, it could end up being be the key query of our time. Indeed, a lot of experts think that water is likely to become the main wellspring at the center of future international conflicts. Here on the home front, the situation is not that extreme, but we’ve got our own issues, one of which is that corporations are slowly assuming control of this necessary resource and reselling it in bottles for big profitable bucks.

From the resources water bottles require and the waste they create to the trust in public water supplies that’s undermined by bottled water marketing, it’s just no good. Late yesterday a new call to do something it came over the wires, and it’s worth sharing. The Think Outside the Bottle campaign is asking everyone to pledge to opt for tap water (which is quite often the source of bottled water—how Bizarro World is that?) instead of bottled water and to support efforts to make sure corporations don’t run roughshod over communities and hijack this vital resource of the commons for profit. Makes buckets of sense. Lots of good info at their web site. Read it, sign up, and drink down.

See Full Post
  • Pin It